Tools for Working Wood

 The Work Magazine Reprint Project

WORK No. 122- Published July 18, 1891  

07/18/2014





If you've been following this blog for a while, you'll have noticed that every once in a while we post an issue so crammed full of awesome as to defy description. This is another one of those issues. I've posted a load of pictures below to give you a sense of the thing. All the same, this week I feel compelled to point to a gem among gems and proclaim it required reading for anyone engaged in the act of making.



If you have skip everything else this week but still manage to read this article, that'll be just fine by me. The reason for this is simple. Or maybe the reason is simplicity. I haven't decided yet.



In either case, this little chat about finishing is great because it isn't filled with hacks or secrets. It may not even be about finishing in the long run. No, what we have here is a wonderful and rare compilation of generalist remarks: the tempered advice of an old pro set against the normal tide of tips and techniques.



Alright so it quite a bit about finishing despite my earlier remarks to the contrary. Still, I insist that a larger case is being made. Without putting too fine a point on it, the key thing separating a novice from desired results is experience. Among makers and crafts people, it is a popular diversion to overvalue the multifarious elements of a given task, often to the detriment of the attempt itself. Call it what you like, our humble polisher does well to point us on the straight and narrow.



I'm sure some might consider the tone akin to a wagging finger, but to my ear this guy sounds like all of my favorite shop techs and teachers. They never knew what I was going to make next. They only knew that if they did well, I'd never stop, and that a good foundation of guiding principles would serve me better than a grimoire of gimmicks. -T








Disclaimer: Articles in Work: The Illustrated Weekly Journal for Mechanics describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 122 •




Tags:Woodworking Tools and Techniques,Historical Subjects,Misc.
Comments: 0

WORK No. 121- Published July 11, 1891  

07/11/2014











Disclaimer: Articles in Work: The Illustrated Weekly Journal for Mechanics describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 121 •




Tags:Woodworking Tools and Techniques,Historical Subjects,Misc.
Comments: 0

WORK No. 120- Published July 4, 1891  

07/04/2014






Happy Independence Day from your pals in Brooklyn! Apart from the coincidental publishing date, I have drawn precisely zero connections between this week's Work and today's stateside holiday. Isn't that refreshing? Now, to the issue at hand:



I'm posting two wildly divergent highlights from No. 120 to further press the notion that Work's breadth of scope is a thing to behold. To be sure, I'm far likelier to employ the edge-gluing move described above than to attempt the construction illustrated below. All the same, ambitions projects tempt the imagination, and if inspiration alone is drawn from considering lofty builds, let me be the first to point out that it's better than nothing.






Disclaimer: Articles in Work: The Illustrated Weekly Journal for Mechanics describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 120 •




Tags:Woodworking Tools and Techniques,Historical Subjects,Misc.
Comments: 0

WORK No. 119- Published June 27, 1891  

06/27/2014







Build a better bench stop and the world will beat a mousetrap to your door. In other words, has anyone ever been truly satisfied with the state of bench stops? It stands to reason the answer is no. Patterns and patents abound, likely owing to contradictions inherent in a bench stop's matrix of desirable features.



By example: steel construction may grip the workpiece firmly, but it will do considerable damage to a plane iron in the event of a crash. Softer materials are safer, but prone to wear, swelling, and deformation. Some designs require major bench surgery to install, while others, small and fiddly, often chance being lost. Generally, the method of adjustment will range from irksome to infuriating.



It seems to me there is a quote, probably attributable to Tage Frid, that goes something like this:

"An ideal table will be weighty and rigidly constructed, but easily transportable by a single person, It should be adjustable in height as well as length but require no convoluted mechanisms or removable leaves. It should fit in any room, accommodate any number of guests, have no legs whatsoever and be, on a whim, removable altogether."



Naturally, if someone can correctly attribute this or perhaps just direct me to an unbutchered rendition of this statement, I'd appreciate it. If, on the other hand, you'd prefer dismiss bench stop hand-wringing altogether in favor of something tweakier, Scroll down for a bit from "Shop" on the subject of hammer straightening circular saws. -TIM




Disclaimer: Articles in Work: The Illustrated Weekly Journal for Mechanics describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 119 •




Tags:Woodworking Tools and Techniques,Historical Subjects,Misc.
Comments: 0

WORK No. 118- Published June 20, 1891  

06/20/2014






This one goes out to all the hungry throngs who called to ask about building the Meat Safe designs that appeared in Work No. 76. With the the summer weather coming on, as well as all the recent fervor surrounding the debut of the Festool Cooltainer, this straightforward but exceptionally timely article provides us with a well-rounded, if only slightly démodé, complement to our modern-day aestival food storage scheme. -T







Disclaimer: Articles in Work: The Illustrated Weekly Journal for Mechanics describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 118 •




Tags:Woodworking Tools and Techniques,Historical Subjects,Misc.
Comments: 0

WORK No. 117- Published June 13, 1891  

06/13/2014






Update: Our friends at the V&A were kind enough to send over a photo of the technical staff, which may count among its faces that of the in-house carpenter responsible for Arnold's bracket. Obviously, no conclusive evidence supports this guess, and it has also been pointed out to me that excessive attention to the repairer's work might have proved unsettling for the craftsmen who endeavored so diligently to mount and display collections subtly and without fanfare. Nevertheless, the efforts of generations of conservators deserve more than a little recognition. Though I don't suggest shouting thank yous to technicians you might see atop scaffolding on your next museum visit, learning what we can about their tireless stewardship might prove a more fitting tribute. To that end, let me direct you to an article chronicling the history of the Conservation Department of the V&A by Pauline Webber.

**************



Greetings time-travelers. Upon examination of this week's entry, you may well find yourself asking, "just where is the South Kensington Museum?"



I asked myself the very same, slightly abashed and thinking I certainly ought to remember such a place, having spent more than a few months in London. As it stands, eight years after the printing of Work No. 117, its name would be changed to the Victoria and Albert Museum. I should have been asking, "when?" Classic time-travel rookie mistake.



An attempt to describe the V&A here would be impossible. Rather, I'll just say that if you have the chance to visit, by all means do so and return as often as you can. If you happen to be around on a Friday night, the Friday Late events feature "an ever-changing, curated programme of live performances, cutting-edge fashion, film, installations, debates, special guests and DJs, with bars, food, and late-night exhibition openings."

Last year, the Friday Late organizers asked to use our infamous Paper Carpenter's Hat Instructions for an evening entitled: The Secret Life of Furniture. Understandably, I was on the wrong side of the pond and couldn't attend. Still, I've never seen such enthusiasm for our silly hats stateside, and the organizers were kind enough to share their event photos on Flickr.

What then, you might ask, of our simple bracket? Certainly, that remains to be seen. It's likely that Urquhart Arnold's remarks have long outlasted the piece that inspired them. Then again, I don't know that for sure, and it's possible that our friends at the V&A might be able to guess its whereabouts now that we've established it's whenabouts. -TIM




Disclaimer: Articles in Work: The Illustrated Weekly Journal for Mechanics describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 117 •




Tags:Woodworking Tools and Techniques,Historical Subjects,Misc.
Comments: 2
The opinions expressed in this blog are those of the blog's author and guests and in no way reflect the views of Tools for Working Wood.
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Recent Blogs:
WORK No. 122- Published July 18, 1891-07/18/2014
WORK No. 121- Published July 11, 1891-07/11/2014
WORK No. 120- Published July 4, 1891-07/04/2014
WORK No. 119- Published June 27, 1891-06/27/2014
WORK No. 118- Published June 20, 1891-06/20/2014
WORK No. 117- Published June 13, 1891-06/13/2014
WORK No. 116- Published June 6, 1891-06/06/2014
WORK No. 115- Published MAY 30, 1891-05/30/2014
WORK No. 114- Published MAY 23, 1891-05/23/2014
WORK No. 113- Published MAY 16, 1891-05/16/2014
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WORK No. 111- Published May 2, 1891-05/02/2014
WORK No. 110- Published April 25, 1891-04/25/2014
WORK No. 109- Published April 18, 1891-04/18/2014
WORK No. 108- Published April 11, 1891-04/11/2014
WORK No. 107- Published April 4, 1891-04/04/2014
WORK No. 106- Published March 28, 1891-03/28/2014
WORK No. 105- Published March 21, 1891-03/21/2014
WORK No. 104- Published March 14, 1891-03/14/2014
WORK No. 103- Published March 7, 1891-03/07/2014
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