Tools for Working Wood

 The Work Magazine Reprint Project

WORK No. 137 - Published October 31, 1891  

10/31/2014




CONTEST ALERT: The game is afoot, everybody. This week, amidst the usual wealth of tips and techniques, came a design for a very tweaky bowsaw frame. Frequent contributor "Opifex" is squarely on our turf here, so the Work junta at TFWW determined such a revelation demands an appropriate response. Here are our terms:

The first three people to build the saw frame pictured below and submit a photo of their work will receive a free Gramercy Tools Bow Saw Kit (blades & pins). Scroll on for details.



It would be silly to ask loyal workateers to buy pins and blades to build a saw for the purpose of maybe winning pins and blades, so we'll happily accept photos of your bowsaw without these parts, provided your assembly looks like it's otherwise complete and ready to rock. We just want to treat the first three brave sawmakers to some free hardware.

Pics or it didn't happen: Tools for Working Wood maintains a Facebook Page and a Twitter Feed. Post your photos to either of those places with the hashtag #tfwwworkblog and then come back and let us know in the comments below.

If you have any questions, ask them in the comments too. We have some related resources detailing the design and construction of the Gramercy Bowsaw here and here but none of it explains exactly how to make Opifex's articulated, deep throated contraption. That's up to you and you're on your own. Good luck!






Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 136 •




Tags:Woodworking Tools and Techniques,Historical Subjects,Misc.
Comments: 0

WORK No. 136 - Published October 24, 1891  

10/24/2014










Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 136 •




Tags:Woodworking Tools and Techniques,Historical Subjects,Misc.
Comments: 0

WORK No. 135 - Published October 17, 1891  

10/17/2014









Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 135 •




Tags:Woodworking Tools and Techniques,Historical Subjects,Misc.
Comments: 0

WORK No. 134 - Published October 10, 1891  

10/10/2014




"Nil mortalibus ardui est!" A quote from Horace, lifted from this week's cover story. Loosely: "nothing is impossible for humankind." A grand reference to Prometheus in service of a magnificent article on an early electrical device. Shamelessly, I'm reappropriating the quote in service of some practical instruction found elsewhere in No. 134. Not wishing to take away from the construction of the Winter Electrical Machine, it nevertheless bears being said we receive much more inquiry on the subject of scraper sharpening.



Along similar lines, I'd like to call attention to this helpful entry found in this week's "SHOP." Figuring out insanely flat curves might not come up very often in your shop, but when it does you'll know to reach for these methods. The trick in Figure 4 strikes me as being the most useful for smaller work. -T





Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 134 •




Tags:Woodworking Tools and Techniques,Historical Subjects,Misc.
Comments: 0

WORK No. 133 - Published October 3, 1891  

10/03/2014




Introducing Marisa, a welcome addition to the Work Magazine Reprint Project! Today marks her first blog entry, but by no means her first contribution to the project. Take a moment to say hello in the comments. -T

As a somewhat new member to the Tools for Working Wood team, and brand new to helping with Work Magazine, I'm not sure I can default to the "write what you know" when it comes to holdfasts or lathes or grindstones. But I can write about what I see. As Tim and I sat down to look through this week's issue, we happened upon a scribing block that was sitting on his desk. Scribing blocks it is! I snapped some photos of the ones here in the shop, the first one set with a new file holder the guys have been working on for the Foley Saw filing machine. (Which you can read about in Joel's blog)









Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 133 •




Tags:Woodworking Tools and Techniques,Historical Subjects,Misc.
Comments: 1

WORK No. 132 - Published September 26, 1891  

09/26/2014




"Most of the readers of Work, I daresay, have hobbies." Thanks dude. I'll just leave these plans here. Click the moulding detail to get a face full of section lining. -T









Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 132 •




Tags:Woodworking Tools and Techniques,Historical Subjects,Misc.
Comments: 0
The opinions expressed in this blog are those of the blog's author and guests and in no way reflect the views of Tools for Working Wood.
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Newer Entries...
WORK No. 117- Published June 13, 1891-06/13/2014
WORK No. 116- Published June 6, 1891-06/06/2014
WORK No. 115- Published MAY 30, 1891-05/30/2014
WORK No. 114- Published MAY 23, 1891-05/23/2014
WORK No. 113- Published MAY 16, 1891-05/16/2014
WORK No. 112- Published MAY 9, 1891-05/09/2014
WORK No. 111- Published May 2, 1891-05/02/2014
WORK No. 110- Published April 25, 1891-04/25/2014
WORK No. 109- Published April 18, 1891-04/18/2014
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WORK No. 105- Published March 21, 1891-03/21/2014
WORK No. 104- Published March 14, 1891-03/14/2014
WORK No. 103- Published March 7, 1891-03/07/2014
WORK No. 102- Published February 28, 1891-02/28/2014
WORK No. 101- Published February 21, 1891-02/21/2014
WORK No. 100- Published February 14, 1891-02/14/2014
WORK No. 99- Published February 7, 1891-02/07/2014
WORK No. 98- Published January 31, 1891-01/31/2014
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