Tools for Working Wood

 Joel's Blog at Tools for Working Wood

Cyber Monday - Actually Starts On Sunday Night!  

11/26/2014

This coming Monday, the Monday after Thanksgiving, has become to be known as "Cyber Monday" and on-line retailers (that's us) are supposed to have some really great deals for you. Most years we have pretty much ignored Cyber Monday because let's be fair we are kind of busy and we have pretty good deals year around. However, and this is a trait pretty common amongst all retailer of a certain age, in business for years at the same location. We have tons and tons of perfectly good merchandise that we can't sell for one reason or another. And it piles up. Usually the only thing wrong is a packaging or cosmetic defect, or something we discontinued and have a few left. But in any case the stuff takes up more and more room. So Ben and Nar have spent weeks photographing the tools, writing one line descriptions and getting over three hundred items ready for the chop.

The list include wonderful new old stock that we never got around to selling normally, and dented crap that someone might want for reasons we don't get.

So that's why there has been that poster up on our webpage for the past week. Sunday night, around 10:00 PM Brooklyn time, it all goes live and it's open season. Why Sunday at 10:00 not midnight? We are a small company and the poor sap who has to release everything and not screw it up is me, and if I wait until midnight I will probably pass out first.

BTW we also have no idea if the web site can take the volume of traffic, and actually everyone in on-line retailing is wondering if the entire Internet can take the volume of traffic. We will see.


Also - and this is important - for the first time we are allowing people to reserve items in their baskets. Once you add a sale item into your basket you will have 30 minutes to close the sale, Theoretically more time if nobody else wants it but by 30 minutes we mean 30 minutes. After that, if your order isn't COMPLETED, anyone can put the item into their shopping cart and it will vanish from your cart. So my suggestion is, set up your cart over the weekend with anything else you might want to order (and save on shipping) - such as some gramercy tools, or the new Festool stuff that is shipping on Dec 1 or some brand new ready for winter Blaklader work clothing, and then after 10:00 put the stuff you want in your basket and check out.

Good luck, have fun!

Tags:Product News, Sales, and Promotions
Comments: 0

American Field Show At Industry City Nov 22 - 23, 2014  

11/16/2014

Come to American Field
Next weekend we will be taking a lot of our American made tools and clothing and setting up two blocks away so we can participate in the American Field All American Pop-up Market. This show highlights American Manufacturing from all over the country. Click on the picture to take a look at the list of exhibitors - everyone from old line companies to new companies with a single product. IT's going to be tons of fun.

At the same time - next door - will be The Brooklyn Holiday Market featuring Brooklyn makers and hosted by Wanted Design. A lot of our friends are exhibiting there. Both shows are free I think you will have a great time!

See You There!

Tags:Product News, Sales, and Promotions
Comments: 0

PayPal, Festool, and Cyber Monday  

11/12/2014

This blog post is a catchall letting you know about some of the new things on the horizon here at TFWW. First of all, in addition to all our current methods of payment was have now also accept PayPal for all transactions. On one level PayPal is just another means of buying stuff, but I'm excited because it speeds up checkout. With Paypal checkout becomes simple: Click the "Pay with PayPal" button on the bottom of the shopping cart, or on the checkout page, log onto PayPal, select the address in PayPal, return to our store for shipping method selection, and then confirm the sale. Done. Of course, if you're shopping on mobile, anything that lets you avoid typing in information into a phone is a big step forward.

Cyber Monday: All around our office and warehouse are boxes of tools that for one reason or another aren't on the website. So on Sunday November 30th at 10:00PM(ish) Brooklyn Time, we are putting all this excess stuff on line for a massive Cyber Monday Blowout Sale. Over 200 items will be available! For the first time. you will be able to put something in your cart, and have it reserved for you for 20 minutes or so to give you time to shop some more and then check out. After the 20 minutes, if you don't check out, the items will be removed from your cart so other people can snag them. My big project for the next week is writing the software to make this reservation system work. So details might vary in the final execution. But it's a fair system so two people can't buy the same thing only to have one person disappointed.

Diamond Sharpening: For the past year, we have introduced a new product every week. In the past weeks. DMT diamond sharpening products has been a big new category for us. After years of being on the fence about diamond sharpening I am working on testing and figuring out a sequence of stones to get a great edge for a minimal cost. So far I don't think diamonds are great for the final finish, but they certainly do a fine, fast job of roughing out an edge and staying flat. I'll have a real how-to soon.

Festool: New stuff from Festool will be coming out on December 1st, with pre-orders starting (we hope) next week. The big new tool is the Festool Vecturo Oscillating Multitool, which is a Festool branded Fein Super Cut tool. The Super Cut, which is the top end of the Fein Multi-Master tool, is very popular, and the Vecturo cutters will be interchangeable with the Supercut Tool (not the regular Multi-master). The Big Festool innovation will be several versions of cutting stops that will also fit the Super Cut Tool. The attachments will be available separately for Fein Supercut owners.

Also new from Festool this fall is the return of the Toolie - a wrench with all the metric Allen and screw keys you need for Festool. A hose attachment to give you a third hand, And drawers slides to turn any cabinet into a SysPort.

We will have full information and be ready for pre-order next week or so. Stay tuned for more details!

The picture above, which has nothing to do with any of this, is of one of my favorite new products - our set of mini colored pencils (see photo above). They are cute, portable, and a great stocking stuffer. It even comes with a sharpener, an eraser, and it fits in a wallet. Some people use them in pencil holders - which sounds like it might be a fun lathe project.


Tags:Product News, Sales, and Promotions
Comments: 3

Colen Clenton - A Man and His Shed  

10/29/2014

Colen Clenton is the maker of a range of really wonderful adjustable squares and other measuring tools that we have been proud to stock for many years. I've never met him in person but we have chatted on the phone about this and that for ages from our ends of the earth. When my son was born, Colen sent us a magnificent rattle made of she-oak. He's a wonderful craftsman and a wonderful guy.

This video shows Colen in his New South Wales, Australia, shed workshop. I'm writing this from a Manhattan high-rise but I can admire his very different lifestyle and of course the reverence for craft that we share. Colen began his tool manufacture by making tools for his own use that attracted the eyes of people who coveted them. He speaks warmly and encouragingly to others who would like to earn their livelihood with their crafts. And needless to say, his gorgeous tools are scene-stealing supporting players throughout the video.

http://www.skillsone.com.au/vidgallery/the-toolmaker/

One of the things I find most interesting about Colen's tools is that while they do exactly the same thing as many other measuring tools by other makers, their combination of design, materials, and execution makes them feel wonderful in the hand and amazingly satisfying to use. Watch the video and see how Colen's values and life choices are reflected in his tools.

We stock the complete line of Colen's tool here.
Tags:Product News, Sales, and Promotions,Woodworking Tools and Techniques
Comments: 2

Designing a Moxon Vise  

10/15/2014

In the past few years what has become to be known as a "Moxon Vise" has become a pretty popular workbench accessory. The basic theory behind it is that lots of joinery operations, especially dovetailing, need to be done at a higher bench height than a typical bench - which is usually set for planing operations. In Moxon's engraving from Mechanick Exercises(1678) the vise is placed at an obviously incorrect position, with no way of attaching it to the bench. Felibien, in an earlier book, (which Moxon liberally copied from) shows a group of these vises hanging from a wall behind the main workbench.
I think it was the Lost Art Press' edition of The Art of Joinery that brought the vise back to the limelight and it is now a very popular accessory.
Today several vendors, ourselves included, stock complete Moxon vises ready for use or hardware kits for making your own. Our vise, which was designed and is made for us by the Philadelphia Furniture Workshop, has a couple of unique features, notably a cambered from jaw for ease of clamping, and handles that can be moved out of the way while working. The hardware for the vise, which was a joint design by ourselves and the PFW is specially designed to allow for wear and a lot of give in the wood. Our hardware kit doesn't include drawings for the vise because, while the PFW design is perfect for hordes of people, if you are going to the trouble of making a vise for yourself, you might as well take a moment and decide if some customization is in order. However so many people have asked us for some guidance I thought explaining some design considerations might be in order.

At its most simple the vise is just two boards with screws to clamp them together and enough thickness on the back jaw so that the vise in turn it can be clamped to your bench. The actual size isn't critical. The screws need to be inset far enough in from the ends so the wood doesn't split - a couple of inches at most - and the main dimension is the clamping distance between the screws and the overall height of the vise. Unless you have the urge to have several vises, you want a clamping distance wide enough for any carcase you are likely to make - say 24" max, but 18" or 20" between the screws is probably more realistic. Also you don't want to make such a heavy monster that moving it all the time is a chore. The height is the next issue - you want it high enough so it brings dovetailing to a comfortable height. 4" is fine for most people, 6" might be better for a tall person on a short bench - here is one area where personal preference is important.


Now we are already into two tweaks. By cutting down the ends of the rear jaw into ears you give yourself clamping surfaces that will keep cutting tools away from your holdfasts - the usual device for attaching the vise to your bench.


Among the innovations made by the Philadelphia Furniture Workshop in our vise - a narrow shelf is glued on the back of the rear jaw to create a clamping ledge so that you can clamp your tails down firmly when you lay out your pins.


The way our kit works is that the two acme screws thread into two nuts mortised into the back jaw of the vise. Just locate the holes far enough from the bottom so the nuts have enough clearance and first drill the holes and then mortise away. The nuts we use are custom for the vise and are offset. We found that, especially with a sloppy mortise, a regular nut can spin in the mortises as the vise wears. This design gives you plenty of room for error and you won't have to worry about wear.


The front jaw can be as thin as 4/4 but here again the Philadelphia furniture workshop design has a great innovation. The inside of the jaw is slightly cambered so even if the jaws are tightened unevenly the vise will hold in the center perfectly. Also the thinner front jaw, not only makes the vise lighter, the jaw can bend a little when clamping for a better fit on the work.


Finally it's nice to have a little something to help align the vise to the front edge of your bench.


We didn't use Moxon type vises when I was learning woodworking. What a shame. I cannot imagine not having one now. Especially since between my back and my eyesight (lack of) getting the work closer to me, and not having to slouch down to work is a real boon, Whichever design you use I think it's a really great addition for work holding in the workshop.




Tags:Product News, Sales, and Promotions,Woodworking Tools and Techniques
Comments: 5

The Modern Split  

10/01/2014

I was at the Met this past weekend with a guest, and we ended up in one of the 20th century galleries that I almost never visit. On display among the paintings were four 20th century chairs (from the left). The "Zig Zag" chair by Gerrit Rietveld (1937), an armchair by Koloman Moser (1903), the "31" armchair by Alvar Aalto (1931-32) and the "DCW" Side Chair by Charles Eames (1948).

By the very fact of the display, the Met shows that it considers these chairs important landmarks of 20th Century furniture design. But to me, the chairs also signify the shift in furniture craft: from the craftsman making furniture for a client to the designer making furniture specifically for mass manufacture.

The Rietveld and Moser pieces were designed to be made in a typical cabinet shop. We sell a great book about Rietveld, complete with plans, and you can pretty much make everything in his book with a fairly basic shop. I am not familiar with Moser, but the Moser piece is also pretty accessible. It's woodworking. I get it.

The Aalto and Eames pieces were designed for manufacture. Their clients were furniture corporations, not a person. To make either piece, you would need forms, presses, and equipment. Even if you only want to make one chair, you would still have to make molds and forms for the bent plywood. Most of the work is in the forms, and once you have done that, making multiples is fairly easy.

The Aalto and Rietveld pieces date from about the same time, but it's clear to me that Rietveld is looking backward at the A&C movement and its idea that furniture should be accessible to anyone to build. Aalto, on the other hand, is looking forward to the disconnect between the factory, which can manufacture his flowing designs, and the individual maker who is then left in the dust.

Now, before you point out to me that most American furniture was made in factories, let me point out that the furniture factories of the early 20th Century America made traditional furniture the traditional way -- just faster, with the aid of machines. Stickley made his A&C furniture in a factory, but he published plans so that any competent shop, amateur or professional, could make a copy. (Maybe not as efficiently, but certainly as well.)

These chairs document the two paths furniture has taken in the past century. It's not about traditional versus modern design. It's about designing for mass production versus designing for small production. I am not saying mass production is bad, just that the designs for mass production don't leave room for traditional workshops. And so the modern small shop is caught between two worlds: a desire to explore the limits of craft, and the mass vocabulary of manufacture that people are used to and have come to expect.


Tags:Woodworking Tools and Techniques,Historical Subjects
Comments: 4
The opinions expressed in this blog are those of the blog's author and guests and in no way reflect the views of Tools for Working Wood.
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