Tools for Working Wood

 Joel's Blog at Tools for Working Wood

How to Install a Saw Blade in a Folded Back  

05/06/2010

The strangest part of building one of our dovetail saw or carcase saw kits is attaching the blade to the back. The problem with the obvious method of clamping the blade and banging on the back is that it's pretty easy to have the blade slip in the vise and get scratched or ding the brass back.
With the traditional method we use, we bang on the teeth. The teeth bed down into the soft wooden bat and are protected. The back of course is supported along its entire length. It's also as you can see, very very fast (30-40 seconds including set up time). It's counter-intuitive but very safe. Batting the blade is the traditional method used by all the English and I assume American sawmakers of the last century and Flinn in England now. You can also exert a lot more force with a 2 foot wooden bat than a plastic mallet without fear of damage to the hard brass. We do get a lot of questions about this part of the kit so we decided to make a series of very short videos of saw blades being inserted into backs.









Tags:Product News, Sales, and Promotions,Woodworking Tools and Techniques
Comments: 5
05/06/2010mike (dimner) 
Joel,

Fascinating series of clips. Thank you very much.

What are the purpose of the holes in the blade that a buried into the folded back?

Thanks,

--Mike
05/07/2010Derek http://Cohen
Joel, so this is what you Yanks think our cricket bats are used for?! :)

No wonder there is no support for its inclusion in the next Olympic Games.

Regards from Perth

Derek
05/10/2010joel http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com
The holes they are for attaching the blade to a block for slitting your kit saw handles if you need to slit the handle that way.
05/10/2010Gregg 
That is very interesting and informative. Although it still scares me to think of banking on the teeth the knowledge that you guys do it and that it is historically accurate sure makes me feel better about doing it.

Thanks
05/22/2010Bill 
Derek
Cricket balls are hard enough to hold a toothed blade in them. If, instead of seeing how far and where the ball could be batted with someone jogging after it, one could just saunter over to the ball, retrieve it, see how far the blade had penetrated the ball, and points given accordingly. That might be more exciting than the current game. Of course you could hammer toothed bales into the wickets to challenge the bowler.
You could still keep your standard bat for all of this.
(from a Canuck)
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